THE MASCOT GALLERY

FINE ART PRINTS BY REVERE LA NOUE

CELEBRATING THE HISTORY AND TRADITION BEHIND THE MASCOT

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THE ORIGINAL BLUE DEVIL PRINT SERIES BY REVERE LA NOUE             

THE BLUE DEVILS GALLERY

All imagery and artwork on this site is created and copyrighted by Revere La Noue, 2009.

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THE TAR HEEL ABSTRACT,

On White

11 by 14 in.

Artist Signed, Open Edition

THE ORIGINAL BLUE DEVILS,

THE CAPE AND THE SPEAR

20 by 24 in.

Artist Signed, 300 Print Limited Edition

THE ORIGINAL BLUE DEVILS,

THE BLACK CAPE 

16 by 20 in.

Artist Signed, Open Edition

THE ORIGINAL BLUE DEVILS, Les Diables Bleus

11 by 14 in.

Artist Signed, Open Edition

THE ORIGINAL BLUE DEVILS, The Devil’s Tail

11 by 14 in.

Artist Signed, Open Edition

THE ORIGINAL BLUE DEVILS, The Soldier’s Tail

11 by 14 in.

Artist Signed, Open Edition

Today the origin of the Duke University mascot is virtually forgotten, even though its instant, national recognition has long been established. Fans are often surprised to discover the Blue Devils' origin is more military and patriotic than religious. During World War I the Chasseurs Alpins, the French Alpine Light Infantry Battalion, nicknamed "les Diables Bleus" or "the Blue Devils," were well known, valiant soldiers. They first gained attention when their unique training and alpine knowledge was counted upon to break the stalemate of trench warfare in the French Alps. The Blue Devils won accolades for their courage. Their distinctive blue uniform, with flowing cape and jaunty beret, captured the public imagination. When the United States entered the war, units of the French Blue Devils toured the country helping raise money and recruit soldiers to the war effort. Irving Berlin captured their spirit in song describing them as "strong and active, most attractive . . . those Devils, the Blue Devils of France." In 1922, The Trinity Chronicle began the academic year referring to the Duke University athletic teams as the Blue Devils. The freshman class was comprised of the first post-war students, and the rest of the student body was full of returning veterans - at that time the mascot name needed no explanation.